Do You Burn More Fat Running on the Treadmill or Outside?


Organizations like the American Heart Association suggest that all adults get at least 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week, or about 30 minutes a day, most days of the week. One of the primary ways that many people achieve this goal is through running, which provides a high-calorie burn that can contribute to fat loss. When running you have two different choices, indoor and outdoor. However, the amount of fat you can burn with each running option is based more on intensity level rather than location.

Calorie Deficit

In order to burn fat, you need to create a calorie deficit. A calorie deficit occurs when you burn more calories than you consume. When this happens, your body is forced to turn to other sources for energy, typically starting with the fat stored in your adipose tissue. In relation to running, how much fat you burn depends on the intensity of your exercise, with more intense exercise being associated with greater potential fat burning.



Incline

One factor that determines whether you burn more calories on a treadmill versus outside is incline. The steeper the incline, the harder your muscles have to work to propel you up the hill. As such, if the setting of your treadmill is at a higher setting than the natural incline of your running route outdoors --- and in both cases you are running the same speed --- you are going to burn more calories on the treadmill. If the outdoor incline is greater, you will burn more calories outdoors.

Speed

Speed can also affect whether you burn more calories running outdoors or on a treadmill. Like increasing your incline, increasing your speed also burns more calories and help you create a greater calorie deficit. However, on a treadmill, maintaining a constant speed is more achievable since you can set the treadmill belt to move at the speed of your choice, while running outside can cause variances in your speed throughout the route.

Handles

Using the machine's handles can cause you to burn fewer calories on a treadmill. Many people use treadmill handles for balance and support. However, when you don't hold on to the handles, you engage your core muscles more for balance, resulting in a slight increase in calorie burn. Not holding onto the handles also allows you to swing your arms or hold them up close to your side in a running position, which also slightly increases your calorie burn.


Top 7 Secrets To Boost Your Brain Memory

Photo: "Top 7 Secrets To Boost Your Brain Memory".

1. Playing games and solving puzzles:
Any activity that requires us to use the brain to find solutions to problems have been proven to be a great way of sparking creativity. This does not only mean classic games such as chess and sudoku puzzles but also video games that include puzzle solving.

2. Develop your concentration abilities.
Learn a meditation technique and build your ability to remain focused like a laser. Smart people can concentrate for longer periods of time than dummies!

3. Think positively.
This sounds like a right old chestnut, doesn’t it? But thinking positively enables you to access your higher thinking abilities. When you are positive and feeling good your mind functions smoothly. Ask yourself emotion-leading questions like, “What am I grateful for right now?” and “Who do I love and who loves me?”

4.  Go for variety:
Why do you always order the same dish when you go out to a restaurant? People like routine. We feel comfortable doing things we know how to do, and tend to avoid new things or things we dont know. This creates stagnation in our brain however and to overcome this laziness of the mind we need to challenge it with variety. I am not saying you have to go and try grilled cockroaches right away, but I do encourage you to try that other dish on the menu that you never tried out.

5. Practice image streaming.
Another super technique courtesy of mind maestro Win Wenger. Image streaming is a process of describing aloud what’s going on in your stream of consciousness. It is incredibly powerful. I repeat. Image streaming is an incredibly powerful process to improve your brain power in dramatic, life changing ways.

6. Supplement your diet with Omega-3 oils.
Your brain laps this stuff up! Get good quality fish-oil capsules.

 7. Learn to mind-map.
Mind-mapping is a great technique invented by Tony Buzan. It helps you think and remember better. You will find it an incredibly valuable and easy skill to learn.

>Mushtaq<




1. Playing games and solving puzzles:
Any activity that requires us to use the brain to find solutions to problems have been proven to be a great way of sparking creativity. This does not only me

an classic games such as chess and sudoku puzzles but also video games that include puzzle solving.

2. Develop your concentration abilities.
Learn a meditation technique and build your ability to remain focused like a laser. Smart people can concentrate for longer periods of time than dummies!

3. Think positively.
This sounds like a right old chestnut, doesn’t it? But thinking positively enables you to access your higher thinking abilities. When you are positive and feeling good your mind functions smoothly. Ask yourself emotion-leading questions like, “What am I grateful for right now?” and “Who do I love and who loves me?”

4. Go for variety:
Why do you always order the same dish when you go out to a restaurant? People like routine. We feel comfortable doing things we know how to do, and tend to avoid new things or things we dont know. This creates stagnation in our brain however and to overcome this laziness of the mind we need to challenge it with variety. I am not saying you have to go and try grilled cockroaches right away, but I do encourage you to try that other dish on the menu that you never tried out.

5. Practice image streaming.
Another super technique courtesy of mind maestro Win Wenger. Image streaming is a process of describing aloud what’s going on in your stream of consciousness. It is incredibly powerful. I repeat. Image streaming is an incredibly powerful process to improve your brain power in dramatic, life changing ways.

6. Supplement your diet with Omega-3 oils.
Your brain laps this stuff up! Get good quality fish-oil capsules.

7. Learn to mind-map.
Mind-mapping is a great technique invented by Tony Buzan. It helps you think and remember better. You will find it an incredibly valuable and easy skill to learn.

Smallest Organs of the body

What is the smallest organ that is part of the gross anatomy of the human body?

10. Kidney
The kidneys, organs with several functions, serve essential regulatory roles in most animals, including vertebrates and some invertebrates. They are essential in the urinary system and also serve homeostatic functions such as the regulation of electrolytes, maintenance of acid-b

ase balance, and regulation of blood pressure. They serve the body as a natural filter of the blood, and remove wastes which are diverted to the urinary bladder. The kidney is approximately 11–14 cm in length, 6 cm wide and 4 cm thick.

9. Spleen
The spleen is an organ with important roles in regard to red blood cells and the immune system. In healthy adult humans, it is approximately 11 centimetres (4.3 in) in length. It usually weighs between 150 grams (5.3 oz) and 200 grams (7.1 oz) and lies beneath the 9th to the 12th thoracic ribs.

8. Cerebellum
The cerebellum ( little brain) is an organ located on the back of the (big) brain that plays an important role in motor control. It is also involved in some cognitive functions such as attention and language, and probably in some emotional functions such as regulating fear and pleasure responses. It has been estimated that its dimensions are 6 cm × 5 cm × 10 cm.

7. Hypothalamus
Hypothalamus is known as the ‘brain behind the endocrine system’. The automatic nervous system is governed by it. Located near the pituitary gland at the basal part of the skull, it also controls pituitary secretions. All the automatically adjusted factors such as body temperature, blood pressure, cardiovascular system and abdominal visceral regulation are controlled by the hypothalamus. As we grow older, hypothalamus requires support to maintain optimum level of performance. Dysfunction of the hypothalamus results in depression or abnormal responses to stress. It also leads to disturbances in the brain.

6. Gallbladder
The gallbladder (cholecyst, gall bladder) is the second smallest organ that aids digestion and stores bile produced by the liver. In humans the loss of the gallbladder is usually easily tolerated. The gallbladder is a hollow system that sits just beneath the liver. In adults, the gallbladder measures approximately 8 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter when fully distended.

5. Testicle
In healthy adult human males, average testicular volume is 18 cm³ per testis, with normal size ranging from 12 cm³ to 30 cm³. The average testicle size after puberty measures up to around 2 inches long, 0.8 inches in breadth, and 1.2 inches in height (5 x 2 x 3 cm).

4. Eye
The vertical measure of the eye is about 24 mm among adults, at birth about 16–17 mm (about 0.65 inch). The eyeball grows rapidly, increasing to 22.5–23 mm (approx. 0.89 in) by the age of three years. From then to age 13, the eye attains its full size. The volume is 6.5 ml (0.4 cu. in.) and the weight is 7.5 g (0.25 oz.)

3. Pituitary gland
Pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea and weighing 0.5 g (0.02 oz.), in humans. It is a protrusion off the bottom of the hypothalamus at the base of the brain, and rests in a small, bony cavity (sella turcica) covered by a dural fold (diaphragma sellae). The pituitary is functionally connected to the hypothalamus by the median eminence via a small tube called the infundibular stem (Pituitary Stalk). The pituitary fossa, in which the pituitary gland sits, is situated in the sphenoid bone in the middle cranial fossa at the base of the brain. The pituitary gland secretes nine hormones that regulate homeostasis.

2. Parathyroid gland
Parathyroid glands are small endocrine glands in the neck that produce parathyroid hormone. Humans usually have four parathyroid glands, which are usually located on the rear surface of the thyroid gland, or, in rare cases, within the thyroid gland itself or in the chest. Parathyroid glands control the amount of calcium in the blood and within the bones. They are about the size of a grain of rice and usually weigh between 25mg and 40mg in humans.

1. Pineal Gland
The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the “third eye”) is the smallest endocrine gland in the human body. It produces the serotonin derivative melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and seasonal functions. Its shape resembles a tiny pine cone (hence its name), and it is located near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two rounded thalamic bodies join.
 

Top 10 Brain Damaging Habits

1. No Breakfast
 People who do not take breakfast are going to have a lower blood sugar level. This leads to an insufficient supply of nutrients to the brain causing brain degeneration. 
2. Overeating
 It causes hardening of the brain arteries, leadingto a decrease in mental power. 
3. Smoking 
It causes multiple brain shrinkage and may lead to Alzheimer disease.
 4. High Sugar Consumption 
Too much sugar will interrupt the absorption of proteins and nutrients causing malnutrition and may interfere with brain development.
 5. Air Pollution 
The brain is the largest oxygen consumer in our body. Inhaling polluted air decreases the supply of oxygen to the brain, bringing about a decreasein brain efficiency. 
6 . Sleep Deprivation 
Sleep allows our brain to rest. Long term deprivation from sleep will accelerate the death of brain cells.
 7. Head Covered
 While Sleeping Sleeping with the head covered increases the concentration of carbon dioxide and decrease concentration of oxygen that may lead to brain damaging effects. 
8. Working Your Brain During Illness 
Working hard or studying with sickness may leadto a decrease in effectiveness of the brain as well as damage the brain.
 9. Lacking in Stimulating Thoughts
 Thinking is the best way to train our brain, lacking in brain stimulation thoughts may cause brain shrinkage. 
 10. Talking Rarely
 Intellectual conversations will promote the efficiency of the brain.

6 Surprising Eye Health Myths


Parents ever tell you that eating carrots would save you from wearing glasses? Or that sitting too close to the TV could make you go blind? Their advice may sound rather mixed to you as an adult. But what exactlyis good or bad for your eyes? Read on to find out whether any of the offbeat stuff you've heard is truly legitimate or the stuff of urban eye-health legends.
Myth: Eating carrots will improve your vision.
The truth: No studies to date show that your eyesight will get sharper just by eating more carrots. Carrots do, however, contain vitamin A -- a nutrient your eyes need to function properly -- so a deficiency would be bad news for your eyes. Keep the rabbit food on the menu. Just don't bother with vitamin A supplements, because your body doesn't need a ton of the stuff, and getting more than you need of the supplement form can be harmful to your health. 
Myth: Working on a computer is bad for your eyes.
The truth: Computer eyestrain has less to do with computers and more to do with the way you work on them. Most of us forget to blink and take breaks as often as we should while working or reading, so all that time spent staring at the screen can make eyes tired and dry. It might even give you a headache. But it won't damage your eyes, especially if you treat your eyes right while working. 
Myth: Reading in dim light damages your eyes.
The truth: Reading or doing crossword puzzles in lower light won't hurt your eyes, but it is very likely to tire them out. That's the extent of the damage. Still, you should try to make things easier on your eyes and work in adequate lighting as much as possible.






Myth: If you wear glasses or contacts, your eyes will become dependent on them, and your vision will get worse.
The truth: Wearing glasses or contact lenses doesn't weaken your eyesight. It's things like aging, injury, disease, or genetic factors that make vision worse -- not using vision correction.
Myth: Sitting too close to the TV is bad for your eyes.
The truth: Just like when you stare at your computer screen too long, you might get a headache from sitting too close to your TV. But there is no proof that the close distance is damaging. Still, needing to sit closer to the TV might be a sign of nearsightedness, so you may need to have your vision checked. 
Myth: Wearing the wrong eyeglasses is bad for your eyes.
The truth: Wearing the wrong prescription (like someone else's glasses) or not wearing glasses at all won't harm your eyes. But only wearing your correct prescription will give you optimal vision -- and who wouldn't want that?

8 Ways to Beat Bad Breath



No one likes to have (or smell) bad breath. Fortunately, it's simple to prevent. A foul smell coming from your mouth is usually caused by bacteria, so keeping your teeth (and tongue) clean and eating certain foods will do the trick.
Follow these simple tips for better breath.
1. Stay On Top Of Your Teeth

 Your first and easiest line of defense is good oral care. Cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease can all be underlying causes of odor, says Sally Cram, DDS, a Washington DC based periodontist and a consumer advocate for the American Dental Association. Brush twice a day and floss at least once daily to remove the plaque and bacteria that accumulates on your teeth and under your gumline. And be sure to visit your dentist twice a year for a checkup and professional cleaning.

2. Clean Your Tongue

 The fleshy surface of the tongue is a prime breeding ground for harmful bacteria and accounts for a large percentage of halitosis cases; but most people neglect this crucial area when brushing. To dislodge the offending build-up take a regular soft bristle toothbrush and make a few gentle strokes down the tongue from back to front once a day, says Cram. Depending on the anatomy of your tongue--some people have a lot of grooves -you might want to invest in a tongue scraper for more effective cleaning. Check with your dentist for the best option based on your needs.

3. Go Sugar-Free
Reaching for mints and gum can help mask that dragon breath but if you're using sugary brands you're actually adding to the problem. Bacteria in your mouth tend to ferment sugar, which leads to those very unpleasant odors, says Cram. So stick with sugar-free solutions. And while you're at it, cutting down on sugar in the rest of your diet can go a long way in snuffing out those icky smells.

4. Wet Your Whistle
Your saliva contains vital protective enzymes that help kill bad bacteria, so a dry mouth can be contributing to your smelly situation. Staying hydrated will help stimulate the salivary glands and keep your mouth properly moisturized. If you're guzzling the optimal 8 glasses of H2O a day and you're still desert-dry, check for these additional issues:
  • Are you on any medications? Dry mouth is often a side effect of certain meds like antihistamines for chronic allergies, antidepressants and antianxieties, or blood pressure pills. Ask your dentist if she can recommend products like mouthwash and toothpaste made especially for dryness or salivary substitutes that help lubricate the tissues in your mouth and take the place of missing saliva.
  • Are you extremely dry first thing in the morning? It could be a sign that you are breathing with your mouth open all night due to problems like sleep apnea, a bad bite, or sinusitis. Check with your doctor. Clearing up some of these issues can quickly put that bad breath to rest.






5. Pass the Bread 
A low-carb, high protein diet may be the cause of that killer bad breath according to an analysis by the Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine. The key to these diets is a fat-burning state known as ketosis when your body burns stored fats to use as fuel instead of the missing carbs. As the fat burns, chemicals called ketones accumulate in the body and are released in your breath. Since this is a metabolic problem originating in your stomach and not your mouth there's not much you can do other than modifying your diet.

6. Take a Tea Break
Drinking tea can do more than soothe your soul, according to findings presented at an annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. It can also help that halitosis. The research out of the University of Illinois at Chicago shows that polyphenols, chemical components found in black and green tea, can prevent the growth of the bacteria responsible for bad breath as well as the bacteria's production of putrid smelling compounds. So try a cup of Lemon Zinger and zap out those funky fumes!

7. Spice It Up
Cardamom, a sweet exotic spice often found in Indian cooking, has been known to contain antibacterial properties and has been used for ages as a natural breath freshener. The cardamom plant is high in a compound called cineole, a potent antiseptic that kills bacteria and alleviates bad breath. Chew on a few cardamom seeds as an alternative to mints and gum or try fennel seeds, another herbal remedy also known to work on bad breath.

8. Get a Physical
If you've been on top of your dental care, have tried all of the above and your breath could still peel the paint from the walls, it's time to ring up the doc. Chronic nasty breath can be a symptom of a variety of other underlying medical issues such as diabetes, severe sinus infections, post-nasal drip, GI disorders, or liver and kidney problems.

Bike Safety Tips for Kids


Spring has sprung and the number of bicycles out on the streets is amazing. It's great to see families out for rides together and children getting exercise. However, it is disheartening to see the low level of bike safety that many of these families are practicing while they ride.
Here are some tips to bear in mind for keeping your whole family safe while riding bikes.
Make your child wear a helmet on every bike ride. I can't tell you how many people only make their child wear a helmet on "long" bike rides, or say "Well, she only rides in the driveway." The helmet protects the child's head if she falls, and falls can happen just as easily on your driveway as in any other place. Falls happen anywhere and everywhere, and the concrete is always just as inflexible.
Wear a helmet yourself. This is one of my biggest pet peeves. I see families coasting along all the time where the children are wearing helmets but the parents are not. I've seen some horrible head injuries in adults from bicycle trauma, and I assure you that our adult heads are not any safer from injury if we fall. Be a role model and be safe.






Make sure all your helmets are specifically designed for bicycling. Football helmets don't count. Baseball batting helmets don't count. And if your child does fall, always inspect his helmet for cracks. Never use a cracked helmet, and it's probably wise never to buy a used helmet unless you know its history.
Make sure your child's bike is appropriately sized. Bikes that are too big can be dangerous. When your child is sitting on the seat and grasping the handlebars, he or she should be able to place the balls of the feet on the ground.
Teach your child the "rules of the road." Ride with the flow of traffic, use hand signals for turns and stops, and obey traffic signals and signs. And if, say, you've gotten into the habit of coasting through stop signs, break that habit before your kids pick it up.
Keep an eye on their bike-riding abilities and skills. If, for example, your child cannot perform the hand signals while riding the bike, he or she should not be riding in the street yet.
Don't let your child ride a bike at night, at dawn, or at dusk. It's just too hard for motorists to see them. Serious cyclists use a lot of special equipment if they ride in the dark. Most kids don't have this type of equipment and most parents probably don't want to pay for it.  Reflectors on the child’s bike are always a good idea for daytime but are not sufficient for nighttime riding.
Riding bikes together is a great family activity, but please remember to be safe andbe a good role model!

13 Dangerous Baby Products to Avoid


When you’re shopping for kid stuff, you might assume that everything for sale in those baby stores is safe. The products are made for children, after all—and they must be government-regulated, right? Not necessarily.
Some widely sold baby products have been associated with injuries and even deaths. In fact, 40 percent of all recalls last year were for kids’ products. So before you buy anything (or accept hand-me-downs), check our guide to learn which products are hazardous and find out what the safe alternatives are.

Drop-side cribs

Unsafe bedding
1. Drop-side cribs. 2. Bumpers. 3. Sleep positioners. 4. Blankets and pillows.

Why they’re dangerous: The moveable drop side can drop, suffocating or strangling a baby. The cribs were associated with at least 32 deaths since 2000, plus hundreds of other reported incidents, before they were banned by the CPSC in 2011 (before that, millions were recalled).
What to use instead: A new crib with fixed sides and a simple design (infants can strangle if clothing gets caught on fancy embellishments). Tough crib standards went into effect with the drop-side ban, so look for a model made after June 2011. If you already own a crib that has a drop side, you can immobilize it with included hardware or call the manufacturer and ask for a kit. But don’t use any crib more than 10 years old because there have been many other safety improvements in the past decade.

Bumpers

Why they’re dangerous: Bumpers are designed to keep a baby from hitting her head on crib slats. But they’re a suffocation hazard and may be linked to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. A study in The Journal of Pediatrics found that 27 children from 1 month to 2 years old died from suffocating or strangling related to bumpers between 1985 and 2005. The American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that parents not use crib bumpers, including so-called breathable models.
What to use instead: Nothing. Our safety experts recommend a bare crib with just a fitted sheet. (See “Sleep positioners” and “Blankets and pillows,” below.)

Sleep positioners

Why they’re dangerous: These are used to keep a baby from rolling onto her stomach, or to elevate her head and back to avoid acid reflux. But babies can suffocate if they put their faces against a sleep positioner or if they slip free and roll into crib bedding. The CPSC cites 13 deaths over the past 13 years. Along with the Food and Drug Administration, the CPSC has called for a ban on antireflux wedges, but the products are still available.
What to use instead: The AAP recommends that infants be placed on their backs to reduce the risk of SIDS. If your baby has reflux or congestion, talk to your pediatrician.

Blankets and pillows

Why they’re dangerous: A baby can become tangled in a blanket and suffocate, or be smothered by a pillow. Most of the 92 deaths in bassinets, cradles, and play yards reported between 2006 and 2008 were from suffocating with pillows or extra bedding. Adult bedding can smother little ones, too, and children have died when parents have rolled onto them in a “family bed,” so our experts don’t recommend co-sleeping with children.
What to use instead: Keep your baby comfortable in her bare crib by dressing her in a sleep sack or footed pajamas. If you receive a cute blanket as a gift, hang it on a wall or use it for tummy time.

Crib tents



Why they’re dangerous: The dome-shaped or drape-style tents are intended to keep a baby from climbing out of cribs and play yards. But babies can get wrapped up in the fabric and strangle.
What to use instead: If your little one is climbing out of her crib, it is time for a toddler bed, which looks like a regular bed but uses a crib mattress.





Bedside sleepers

Why they’re dangerous: Also called co-sleepers, these allow infants to sleep near their mother for nursing, but the CPSC hasn’t established safety regulations for them. Also, the AAP didn’t add them to its list of recommended places for a baby to sleep, and our safety experts don’t recommend them, or co-sleeping in general, due to the risk of suffocation. And again, children have died from sleeping parents rolling onto them.
What to use instead: A full-sized crib with fixed sides.

Changing tables with fewer than four sides

Why they’re dangerous: A child could fall to the floor. The CPSC estimates that in 2009 about 4,500 children younger than age 5 were injured in incidents related to changing tables.
What to use instead: The latest voluntary safety standards require any changing table with a flat surface to have barriers on all four sides. A safety strap for securing your baby is a bonus. Another safe option is to use a changing pad on the floor. Additional safety tips: Always stand to your baby’s side when you change her, always keep one hand on her, and never step away. At age 2, kids are probably too big for changing tables.

Unsecured furniture
Why it’s dangerous: Toppling furniture can kill a child in an instant. Between 2000 and 2008, the CPSC received reports of almost 200 child deaths related to furniture tip-overs, almost all of them (93 percent) involving children 5 and younger. Another 16,000 kids 5 and younger were treated in emergency rooms because they were injured by falling furniture, TVs, or other appliances, according to the CPSC’s most recent data.
What to use instead: No, you don’t have to buy new furniture; simply secure yours to the wall with straps. Just be sure to install them properly (screw fasteners into studs or wood framing inside the walls). You can buy antitip straps or brackets starting around $7 at home-improvement retailers.

Sling carriers



Why they’re dangerous: Carrying your baby in front of your body keeps her close, but over the past 20 years, there have been at least 14 deaths associated with sling-type front baby carriers. There have also been dozens of injuries, including skull fractures, head injuries, and contusions and abrasions. Most occurred when the child fell out of the sling. Recalls of specific models in recent years (some because of death or serious injury) have prompted ASTM International to develop a new standard for slings, one that we feel is not stringent enough. The CPSC has also documented a risk of death from “positional asphyxia,” or suffocation, particularly in infants younger than 4 months. The risk is that a small infant’s head could bend forward or her face could press against the adult’s body, both of which can block the baby’s airway and cause suffocation.
What to use instead: Strollers, handheld baby carriers or car seats, and some strap-on carriers. Soft front-carriers and backpack carriers are covered by safety standards developed by ASTM International; we think those standards are adequate. Safety tip: Practice using any carrier before putting the baby in.

Walkers

Why they’re dangerous: They can help a baby stand and walk before she can do it on her own. But walkers also allow your baby to scoot into danger and maybe even fall down stairs. The CPSC estimates that 4,000 children younger than 5 suffered injuries related to baby walkers, jumpers, and stationary exercisers in 2010 (the government agency does not separate those items in its data), and four deaths between 2006 and 2008. The AAP urges parents not to use baby walkers and has recommended that the U.S. government ban them. (They’re now prohibited in Canada.) Even walkers that meet existing safety criteria are not safe. For example, rubber friction “safety” strips, meant to function as a brake to stop the walker if its front wheels go over the edge of a step, do not always work and might wear out or come loose.
What to use instead: A stationary or “walk around” activity center, which lets your child stand or move safely in a circle on a secure base.

Infant bath seats


Why they’re dangerous: They’re designed to help a child sit upright in a bathtub but they give parents a false sense of security. Bath seats can tip over and babies can fall into the water and drown. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports 174 deaths and 300 incidents between 1983 and 2009. Many involved babies who were left unattended. In 2010 the CPSC issued a new federal safety standard for the seats, strengthening the voluntary standard developed by the industry experts at ASTM International. But we still don’t recommend them.
What to use instead: A hard plastic baby bathtub. Never leave your baby unattended or turn your back. Keep one hand on the baby at all times.

Bumbo seats



Why they’re dangerous: These cute and colorful chairs are used to help younger babies sit upright, but infants can fall from Bumbo baby seats by arching, leaning, or rocking themselves, the CPSC warned in a November 2011 safety alert. The alert cited at least 45 incidents involving infants falling out of seats that were placed on tables, countertops, or adult-sized chairs. Of them, 17 babies younger than 1 year wound up with skull fractures from their falls.
What to use instead: A bouncer seat or stationary activity center. Never place on a table, counter, or bed with your child in it. The seat could tip over.

 
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